The highest priority of the RMA Network of fertility clinics is the health and safety of our patients and employees. To respect the safety of all, we ask everyone to follow the CDC’s recommendation to wear cloth face coverings when entering an RMA office.

RMA remains open and operating at full capacity.

We are seeing new patients via telehealth and in-person appointments. All fertility services are available, including IVF, IUI, and all other procedures.

RMA has a comprehensive COVID-19 risk mitigation plan to combat the spread of Covid-19. We are actively monitoring patients and staff for COVID-19 exposures and symptoms. If an RMA employee tests positive for Coronavirus, we will notify any patients who may have had a high-risk encounter with an affected individual. Given we are using appropriate personal protective equipment, we believe there is minimal risk of exposure to patients.

 

RMA Philadelphia Update – January 3, 2021

To protect our patients and staff from the recent surge in COVID-19, we can no longer allow support persons to attend appointments. Support persons include partners, friends, and family members.

We understand that this is disappointing and we will allow partners back into the office as soon as it is safe to do so, but for now, please come to your appointment alone.

 

RMA New Jersey Update – January 1, 2021

While  New Jersey state guidance allows support persons to appointments, we strongly encourage patients to come alone to reduce potential exposures.

 

RMA New Jersey and Lehigh Valley Update – October 5, 2021

Fully vaccinated patients are now exempt from routine and pre-operative COVID testing.

Here’s how it works:

Send in proof of your vaccination, along with identifying information (full name, email, phone, and date of birth) to [email protected].

We’re accepting vaccination proof in the following forms:

  1. The CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Card issued to the vaccine recipient by the vaccination site or an electronic or physical copy of the same.
  2. Official record from the New Jersey Immunization Information System (NJIIS) or other state immunization registry.
  3. Record from a health care provider’s portal/medical record system on official letterhead signed by a licensed physician, nurse practitioner, physician’s assistant, registered nurse, or pharmacist.
  4. A military immunization or health record from the United States Armed Forces.
  5. Docket mobile phone application record or any state-specific application that produces a digital health record.

 

RMA New Jersey Update – August 20, 2021

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy recently put into place Executive Order 252 which mandates all Healthcare Workers in Ambulatory Surgery Centers or Family Planning Sites be fully vaccinated or have weekly testing for coronavirus by September 7, 2021. By this date, all RMA New Jersey employees will be fully vaccinated or have mandatory weekly testing for coronavirus. Please contact your care team with any questions.

 

RMA New Jersey Update – July 16, 2021

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In accordance with New Jersey State mandate, RMA New Jersey requires masks in all of our facilities.

For the safety of our patients, visitors, and employees face masks are still required for all individuals visiting our practices and surgical centers.

Masks must be worn even if you are fully vaccinated. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has emphasized that the new masking recommendations for fully vaccinated people do not apply to health care facilities.

 

RMA New Jersey Update – May 17, 2021

As of Tuesday, May 25th RMA New Jersey will, in accordance with NJ Administrative Order 2021-11, allow a support person for pregnancy-related office visits.

Per the orders FAQ document, fertility care is included in the definition of pregnancy-related care. Therefore, we will be allowing support persons to accompany patients for all office appointments.

Please note that the regulations for Ambulatory Surgery Centers (EO 20-016) have not changed.

Support persons are still not permitted in the ASC and therefore cannot be present for retrievals or transfers. However, they are permitted to accompany the patient for sign-in and may rejoin them upon discharge.

 

COVID-19 AND FERTILITY FAQ

  • To respect the safety of all our patients and staff, RMA is asking everyone to follow the CDC’s recommendation for wearing cloth face coverings when entering an RMA office. Learn how to make a mask at home.
  • Patients must come alone to morning monitoring, as well as egg retrieval and transfer. We will do our best to ensure that we supply supplemental materials to patients to share with their partners during this process.
  • We have extended morning monitoring hours to allow for social distancing.
  • We are taking extra cleaning precautions in between patients.
  • We are screening patients for COVID-19 before entry into RMA.
  • Please call the office if you have a cold, cough, and/or fever before coming into the office.

WHAT SHOULD WOMEN DESIRING TO UNDERGO FERTILITY TREATMENT DO?

COVID-19 spreads mostly through person-to-person contact within about a 6-foot (1.8 meters) radius, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). People with COVID-19 spread viral particles through coughing and sneezing. The particles can land in the mouths or noses of those nearby. It might also be possible to catch COVID-19 by touching a surface where the virus has recently landed and then touching one’s mouth, nose or eyes. Ethanol, hydrogen-peroxide, or bleach-based cleaners are effective at killing coronaviruses that do survive on surfaces.

We recommend our patients follow CDC guidelines at work, during their daily activities, and their visits to our clinics:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid handshaking.
  • Put distance (6 feet or more) between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
  • If you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or bent elbow.
  • Follow CDC guidelines for travel.
  • If you have symptoms (cough, fever, shortness of breath) or have been in contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, please stay home, call your primary care physician and inform us.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I AM UNDERGOING FERTILITY TREATMENT?

If you are currently in any phase of treatment and are asymptomatic (i.e. not showing any signs of COVID-19 illness), and have not had contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, your treatment can continue as planned.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I AM UNDERGOING FERTILITY TREATMENT AND I DEVELOP SYMPTOMS?

If you are currently in any phase of treatment and become symptomatic (i.e. fever, cough, shortness of breath), we will change your plan. This will be done on a case by case basis. Please stay home, call your primary care provider, and alert us immediately if you notice these symptoms. This is for your benefit as well as to protect the health and safety of other patients and your care providers.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I AM UNDERGOING FERTILITY TREATMENT AND I LEARN THAT SOMEONE I HAD CONTACT WITHIN THE PAST 14 DAYS WAS DIAGNOSED WITH A COVID-19 INFECTION?

If you are currently in any phase of treatment and learn that you have been in contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, stay home, call your primary care provider, and alert us immediately. This is for your benefit as well as to protect the health and safety of other patients and your care providers. We will monitor your progress and adjust your care plan accordingly.

SHOULD I TRAVEL IF I AM PLANNING TO OR CURRENTLY UNDERGOING FERTILITY TREATMENT?

  • We recommend avoiding all non-essential travel during infertility treatment.
  • If you must travel, we ask you to follow CDC guidelines

UPDATE ON THE OMICRON VARIANT

A new COVID-19 variant, known as Omicron, was discovered in South Africa last month and has now spread worldwide. While scientists are just beginning to learn more about the variant, initial reports are reassuring, including for those who are pregnant or looking to get pregnant.

On December 13 2021, here’s what we know:

WHAT IS THE OMICRON VARIANT?

The Omicron variant is a new variant of the Covid-19 virus.  The variant was first detected in South Africa and Botswana in late November and has spread globally.

IS OMICRON DANGEROUS?

Scientists are working around the clock to study the variant and determine how contagious it is, whether it causes serious illness and whether the current vaccines are effective against it.

While reliable scientific data about the variant is just starting to appear, the variant seems to be very contagious, with much unknown. Still, it does not appear to cause serious illness in most cases which is reassuring.

DO THE CURRENT VACCINES PROTECT AGAINST THE OMICRON VARIANT?

This question is still being studied, however, early reports are reassuring.  In fact, Pfizer announced earlier this week that two doses of their vaccine, plus the booster, should offer significant protection against the variant. At the same time, health officials reassured the public that just two doses of an mRNA vaccine would likely protect against serious disease from Omicron.

DOES THE OMICRON VARIANT OR COVID-19 VACCINE/BOOSTER IMPACT FEMALE OR MALE FERTILITY?

Luckily, we do have an answer to this question: absolutely not. This question has been studied thoroughly since the onset of the pandemic nearly two years ago. Study after study – including many studies from fertility clinics on IVF patients and data from natural pregnancies during the pandemic – have proven that neither the virus nor the vaccines affect male or female fertility. However, what does have a negative impact on pregnant women and their babies is the Covid-19 virus or a variant. This is why pregnant women are considered a high-risk population for Covid and are strongly encouraged to be vaccinated and boosted. This is especially true now with the spread of Omicron, even if preliminary data is reassuring about the severity of the disease.

SHOULD YOU TAKE EXTRA PRECAUTIONS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON BECAUSE OF THE OMICRON VARIANT?

Yes! As always, in addition to vaccination and getting a booster, it’s recommended that you social distance, wear a mask and practice good hygiene.  In addition, if you are pregnant or undergoing fertility treatment and are planning to see friends and family indoors for the holidays, you might consider having everyone in your party tested for Covid before the get-together.

WILL THE OMICRON VARIANT IMPACT ANY OF MY APPOINTMENT AT RMA?

No. RMA has offered high-quality care with the highest safety standards since the onset of the pandemic, and we’ll continue to do that. Our patients always come first.

For more information about the Coronavirus please visit: www.cdc.gov/coronavirus